Why do girls need our help in Africa?

Why do girls need our help in Africa?

 

We've been asked on a number of occasions why our support in communities is so focused on girls and women. As you already know, from reading our past reports, there is a direct connection between our GirlStuff.Period project and this project, My World in a Garden - Sister Walls. You might remember, we learned to connect the two projects on the ground, when we realized we could get girls back in school but needed to connect them with the food their families needed in order to keep them in school. 

To answer the question posed in the subject of this report, I'd like to share some information with you as to why the focus we have is so important for developing and struggling communities. 

This is what else we've learned 

What we’ve learned first-hand, in our time in communities and international development, is that when we invest in women there is a substantially bigger benefit to the overall community than when we invest the same resources in men. This is supported by decades of development data from around the world.  

According to the OECD.org, women’s economic participation and their ownership and control of productive assets speeds up development, helps overcome poverty, reduces inequalities and improves children’s nutrition, health, and school attendance. Women typically invest a higher proportion of their earnings in their families and communities than men. 

With even a few years of primary education, women have better economic prospects, fewer and healthier children, and better chances of sending their own children to school. If girls’ education continues to secondary level, they will be better equipped to make informed choices about their lives. 

As a part of this, keeping girls in school is critical to development outcomes and the sustainable success of development efforts. With even a few years of primary education, women have better economic prospects, fewer and healthier children, and better chances of sending their own children to school. If girls’ education continues to secondary level, they will be better equipped to make informed choices about their lives. 

Agents of Change 

Women are agents of change in their families, communities and countries. Increasing the voice and participation of women in politics is essential for advancing issues of importance to women on national agendas, with benefits for both women and men. 

As a global family, it is in all of our best interests to help and support girls to become contributing members of their communities and the future leaders in the countries. Girls in Africa are not asking us to do it all for them, they are simply asking us all to help them be afforded the same opportunities boys are. 

Let’s help Girls in Africa. Spread the word. Educate your Friends and Family. Donate today. 

 

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