Tag Archives: clinic

Where is the water?

Where is the water?

You may have seen the news about the City of Cape Town in South Africa, running out of water within the next 60-90 days. Yes! Just 60 DAYS!! It is a scary thought, especially when they are predicting that most of South Africa will run out of water in the next 17 years. and it is not just South Africa, this is happening worldwide.

More than ever, the efforts to secure water sources in the community of Bergnek, is at the top of our priority list. The water not only supplies residents with water for drinking and sponge baths, it also supplies our vertical and other gardens with the water needed to grow food and help keep girls in school.

Bergnek is fortunate enough to have water sources available, all we have to do is get them activated and that's where you come in, in helping the community install alternative power sources to get the pumps running. With that in mind I'd thought I'd share the notes from the most recent Community Water Council meeting in Bergnek.

Timing

In our last meeting with the water council and project team, we had some important updates. Every two weeks we meet with the Bergnek Water Council on a conference call and then once a quarter we have a more significant update and discussion to address any challenges that have arisen for the community.

Agenda: Project Status & Updates – Next Steps

  • Looking at alternatives for power source – Due to ESKOM's lengthy delays (12-14 months) we may need to use solar panels to power the pump and return the transformer back to ESKOM. -- Warren
  • To stay abreast of progress, it is necessary for us to schedule more group calls. as opposed to the direct calls to individual members of the Bergnek Water and Maintenance Councils. There are personal costs to having the conference call, whether that is for airtime or data on their cell phones, so we need to be creative in how we achieve this.
  • Skype call might be better – if they have data.
  • If the community/MAWO assigns a person from the community, EWB- Central Houston can call them on a regular basis to get the updates. Receiving calls are free.
  • We need to know weekly if all the tanks are being filed up a formal log needs to be maintained that indicates how much water are people able to get now compared to before. Isaac should handle the system logs, as he is the person most involved. Isaac, Josef, & Japi are operating the system with Pete assisting them.
  • Currently only one transformer is working (other side of the road is not working) - Contact ESKOM and Polokwane Maintenance.
  • Pump update: When the electrical pump is working, it is running with the timer for 12 hours. After 12 hours, it fills “1.5 bars” (~38,000 liters) on the tank. The old electrical pump (751) fills 1 bar of the tank – With the help of the diesel pump (611) (next to the electrical pump), the rest of the tank can be filled in an additional 12 hours.
  • Big tank gets full in 1 day (24 hours)
  • It is possible to have more than 2 water runs for a week but most of the taps do not close and the water gets wasted on the ground, so the community is running the pumps with less time. We need to have distribution system checked and maintained.
  • The pulleys are not working for the smaller tanks, so they are not being used.
  • Keith will give EWBCH new contact information for community members to call.
  • Shasi will organize the next call with the community member(s) after receiving the contact information.

Giving you insight into the process

I thought I'd share this information with you all to give you a broader context and insight into what happens in the communities we support. Although the community members work diligently to ensure projects are kept on track and the daily and weekly work is being done, they often times are met with challenges outside of their control or influence.

When we are invited into communities, we make a long-term commitment to work alongside them. We do this because there is no quick fix to the issues they face. The solutions take time to implement and time for us to train and update training for community members as they learn new skills and we move to the next stages of the initiatives and projects.

Share your Excitement

We ask that you forward this project report to 2 friends or begin your own fundraising page for the cause here on GlobalGiving.

We are grateful for your ongoing support and for all you, as a donor, have already done to create positive change in the Bergnek community, and are always grateful for you our supporters, and especially for those of you who give to the One Brick at a Time project every month. Thank you for your contributions, your messages and for sharing the work we do with the wonderful people of Bergnek. We appreciate you and the people of Bergnek most certainly do too.

We won't give up on the communities we serve, and we know you won't either!

Make a gift to My Arms Wide Open today!

One Brick at a Time Update

One Brick at a Time

Welcome to the latest report from our infrastructure project in Bergnek, Limpopo, South Africa! We are grateful for those of you supporting the projects under the One Brick at a Time initiative and welcome our newest donors to the projects.

Having patience is a lot easier said than done

What is always so inspiring to me, and what drives me to go faster, further for our communities is their ability to be patient in the face of scarcity and when their needs are so severe and dire. The scarcity the community faces is that of the resources to be able to provide basic needs like water, food more than once a day, and sanitation.

I’ve been reading a new book by Hans Rosling that was recently recommended by Bill Gates, called ‘Factfulness’. It describes why it is so important to walk away from the term ‘Developing World’ and creates a context for how we should perhaps see our world by breaking the world down into global income levels instead. After reading what I have so far, I have to admit I can truly relate to this method of looking at the world, simply because some of the solutions to really big problems have come to me, not from those of that have but from those that don’t because they have such a unique outlook as a result of the circumstances they find themselves in and have been born into. These solutions and ideas have been nothing but genius, in my opinion, and underscore why it so important to provide help and support within the right context or at least a better context than we have been using to date. I’ve included an excerpt below for you to consider.

Here's how the four global income levels break down: 

Level 1: People live on less than $2 a day. Rosling estimates that one billion people are living at or below this threshold. They get around on their own two barefoot feet, cook over an open flame like a cookfire, fetch water in a bucket, and sleep on the ground.

Some people living in countries like Nepal, Madagascar, and Lesotho all fall into this income category.

Lesotho, Rosling says, has the lowest life expectancy of any country in the world.

Level 2: This is the income group where the majority of the world's people live. They get by on between $2 and $8 a day and might have some possessions like a bicycle, a mattress, or a gas canister for cooking at home.

Countries like Bangladesh, China, Zambia and Nigeria all have people living in this income level, but of course many Chinese and Nigerian people have much higher incomes, especially if they live in big cities.

That's one of the reasons that Rosling argues it's silly to lump entire countries and sections of the world into broad categories like "developing" versus "developed." It's meaningless.

Level 3: This is the second most populous category on Rosling's list, after level 2. People in level 3 live on anywhere from $8 a day to $32. They have running water, might own a motorbike or car, and their meals are a rich and colorful mix of foods from day to day. They also probably have electricity and a fridge, which makes things like studying and eating enough varied nutrients easier.

Egypt, Palestine, the Philippines and Rwanda all have citizens living on this level.

They might have enough money to take small vacations, and their children are generally free to finish high school, because they don't have to drop out early to make money for their family.

Level 4: Like level 1, roughly one billion of the world's people live on this level. They make $32 a day or more and have things like running water (both hot and cold) at home, a vehicle in the driveway, and plenty of nutrients on their plate. They've also likely had the chance to finish twelve years of school, or more.

Just about anyone living in the US, Mexico, South Africa, Sweden or South Korea is going to fall into this income category.

It includes essentially all of what people think of as the "developed" world, but accounts for roughly one-seventh of the global population.

Be cautious about assuming that your level is the best, or most "normal'" level, Rosling says.

"Be cautious about generalizing from Level 4 experiences to the rest of the world," Rosling writes. "Especially if it leads you to the conclusion that other people are idiots."

In light of the information I’ve shared above help us do more, go further, this May in the GlobalGiving Mother’s Day Campaign, because believe me, when I tell you, it IS the mothers, in the rural communities we serve in, that are leading the way, striving to focus every available resource on the betterment of their families and community 

Share your Excitement

We ask that you forward this project report to 2 friends or begin your own fundraising page for the cause here on GlobalGiving.

We are grateful for your ongoing support and for all you, as a donor, have already done to create positive change in the Bergnek community, and are always grateful for you our supporters, and especially for those of you who give to the One Brick at a Time project every month. Thank you for your contributions, your messages and for sharing the work we do with the wonderful people of Bergnek. We appreciate you and the people of Bergnek most certainly do too. 

We won't give up on the communities we serve, and we know you won't either!

 

Get involved with One Brick at a Time or donate today!

 

My World My Garden Sister Walls

My World My Garden Sister Walls

Food security is a challenge the world over in both developing and developed countries.  The challenge is not that we cannot provide food. “We” can provide instant gratification, but this is a short term and band-aid solution. The challenge is being able to provide sustainable food sources. In many cases, a shortage of arable land and garden space contributes to the problem.  The solution is three-fold:  transfer skills, develop sustainable locally based food sources and consider the concept of building vertical food walls.  There has been a definite shift in understanding the value of locally grown food, but in developing countries it is difficult to find land that can sustain crops and in developed countries, it is difficult for communities to give up valuable land space.  The advantage of vertical farming is that it does not take up a lot of space.

This is the intent and underlying objective of the My Arms Wide Open, My World My Garden Causethrough the establishment and management of My World In A Garden® vertical food walls.

Our current goal is to construct at least two sister Vertical Food Wall Systems based on the design and technology of the living wall designed by acclaimed South African artist, Dylan Lewis - http://www.designindaba.com/news-snippet/untamed-garden.

The two food walls will use both vegetable and fruit plants in place of the regular plants used in the original design. One will be located in the Town of Cradock, Eastern Cape, South Africa. The other, a mirror of the Cradock live food wall will be located in the Downtown Eastside, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada at the Ray-Cam Community Centre.

The Vancouver living vertical garden, like its sister wall in South Africa, will bring focus to community, food security and family.  These food walls are about “more than just crops”.  Projects like this can help create a sense of real community as families learn about how to grow and maintain the walls, volunteer to help and share the harvests.

 

Read more:

In each instance, we run our Iziko LabahlaliProgram to engage the younger members of the community directly. The first program related to the food wall project will be run at the Ray-Cam Community Centre in the beginning of August 2011. You can find out about the program at: http://myarmswideopen.org/causes/my-mentor-my-coach.html.

During the spring and summer growing seasons, the garden will generate multiple harvests as well as a limited number of harvests in the autumn and winter seasons.  The fresh vegetables harvested will support both Ray- Cam’s ongoing food program as well as their own community food bank. A portion of each harvest during the growing season will be canned or frozen to augment fall and winter food requirements.

During the fall and winter, the garden’s bottles not being used for vegetables and fruits will be replaced with suitable plants to maintain the wall during the off-season and allow for preparation of new vegetable seedlings for the spring. In addition to the fruit plants grown in the bottles, we intend to plant several fruit trees around the wall to support the surrounding community’s need for fresh fruit.

The fundamental emphasis, however, is on the educational opportunities that the garden and its supporting activities offer for the children and youth of the Vancouver Downtown Eastside. 

The project will create collaboration and a sense of ownership across the community – ownership by the children who will work in the garden; their families, as a result of their own children’s involvement; and other families in the community who will benefit from the garden’s harvests. The intention is for this project inspire other children and youth within the community to take similar steps and spawn additional Vertical Food Wall Systems across the community.

 

CRADOCK, EASTERN CAPE

In Cradock, South Africa, My Arms Wide Open intends to build the garden at the site of the Masizame Community Centre. The garden will be built, maintained and operated by graduates of My Arms Wide Open’s Iziko Labahlali program. The food harvested from the garden will support the children of Nomzamo Day Care Centreand will be sold in the communities within Cradock through existing networks of mini-stores. The plants grown in the garden wall will be chosen based on local culture and community needs. The children, and their caregivers who attend the library and community center each day, will maintain the garden year round.

The ultimate goal of each vertical garden is to turn it into a community enterprise, providing fresh fruit and vegetables at low cost to community members. Although this aspect is relatively longer term, a part of the program for each of the sister walls will include teaching other youth from within the community how to establish their own ‘mini-walls’.

You can participate and support the communities in East Vancouver and Cradock by providingfunding, your time, your expertise, materials or referrals

Go to: http://www.globalgiving.org/projects/my-world-in-a-garden/  and be part of the solution!

 

Girl Fund Campaign and Exciting GirlStuff.Period Update

Girl Fund Campaign and Exciting GirlStuff.Period Update

In the work we do as an organization there is a connection across all of our initiatives, as well between communities. In March we participated in the GlobalGiving Girl Fund Campaign March 1-15, enabling the GirlStuff.Period team to move ahead with some of the goals they have set for themselves in the 2018 year.

The key goals the GirlStuff.Period team has set for this year are to:

  1. Grow the business to a point where it turns the corner on sustainability, and;
  2. Increase revenues and profits enough to be able to distribute 5,000 menstrual pads every school semester to young girls in South Africa.
  3. Create a revenue stream that can support the health needs within the Bergnek village, while we work on grants and funding for the clinic itself.

What will this achieve for the Girls in South Africa that need health services and support from the clinic and GirlStuff.Period? It helps to:

  • End bullying at school for girls
  • Educate them on health and family planning
  • Create more awareness of the Clinic project and support locally for it
  • Give them access to food daily via the My World, My Garden program
  • Finds them employment within and outside GirlStuff.Period
  • Build successful businesses via the My Business, My Community program
  • Teach them how to give back to their communities
  • Make underdeveloped communities in South Africa sustainable

It's about a Girl

Girls are key to ending poverty. If girls are given a chance...to stay in school, get access to health services, delay marriage and childbirth
... it's not only them who benefit - so do their children, families, communities, and countries.

What do girls need? There are 5 priorities girls need to be successful:

  • SAFETY: Girls can't succeed when they live in fear. From creating safe spaces to passing stronger laws, ending violence against girls is the first step to ending global poverty.
  • HEALTH: Female genital mutilation affects more than 125 million girls and women all over the world. Here's how you can prevent more girls becoming statistics.
  • VOICE & RIGHTS: Being born a girl shouldn't mean living with less freedom and rights than a boy. Girls are ready to stand up and be counted, so we're giving them the mic.
  • ECONOMIC SECURITY: Sometimes starting is as simple as opening a bank account. Find out what girls need to protect their assets and earn a safe income.
  • EDUCATION: Educate a girl and you educate a community. All girls deserve the opportunity to learn.

What is SO exciting? The Next Step

The exciting news is that, as a result of your efforts and support, we have been working hard behind the scenes to develop the website for GirlStuff.Period. This is a first step in our women's health initiative and program.  Watch for details in our newsletter, which you can join here, as we will launch the website in the next 3 weeks.


Share your Excitement about GirlStuff.Period

We are looking for donations from as many individuals and organizations as possible and appreciate any and all help that can be provided. We ask that you forward this project report to 2 friends. You can also begin your own fundraising page for the cause on GlobalGiving. This is and exciting step, as it helps to increase donations and furthermore it grows their business even faster.

We are grateful for your ongoing support and for all you, as a donor, have already done to create positive change in the Bergnek community. We are always grateful for you our supporters, and especially for those of you who give to the One Brick at a Time project every month. Thank you for your contributions, your messages and for sharing the work we do with the wonderful people of Bergnek. We appreciate you and the people of Bergnek most certainly do too.

We won't give up on the communities we serve, and we know you won't either!

What’s new with GirlStuff.Period!

What's new with GirlStuff.Period in 2018

We are now bringing the program to a whole new level. We are so excited to tell you more about all that is coming!

 

Our plans for 2018

Prior to My Arms Wide Open, only 10% of girls in South Africa passed 8th grade and went on to graduate. The main reason behind that being they could not afford menstrual products and experienced bullying in school, mostly by boys, and they felt like the only option was to quit. By dropping out of school, they remained in the poverty cycle their whole life and could not find employment. Only 25% of women in rural areas are employed in South Africa.

As we started the program, we have helped over 100 young girls stay in school and move on to graduation. They then found employment and are now able to help their community.

When GirlStuff.Period started in 2011, we were providing 2,500 girls, every semester, with underwear and reusable menstrual pads: what we call menstrual kits. Now, we are looking to provide over 5,000 menstrual kits every semester.

 

It’s all about the big picture: sustainability in South Africa

GirlStuff.Period not only distributes menstrual pads but adds to a bigger picture, increasing the economy within poor South African communities. Ultimately, GirlStuff.Period seeks to forge a cycle where these communities become self-sufficient.

Young girls, by receiving GirlStuff.Period products, can stay in school and avoid bullying, but we noticed, oftentimes, that some of them still dropped out of school. The reason behind this is that these girls must acquire food for themselves and their families. We then decided to establish My World, My Garden, which built vegetable gardens for these communities, so young girls have constant access to food. Therefore, by combining menstrual kits and vegetable gardens, the dropout, in the communities we work in, rate decreased by 40%.

GirlStuff.Period has also increased the employment in the South African communities we work in; in 2017, we employed 8 women full-time. We plan to increase the employment rate by 15% every year starting in 2018 until we have reversed the dropout rate to single digits.

 

What’s next? 

So, you may be wondering what’s next? We have provided young girls in South Africa with menstrual pads, provided an anti-bullying solution, helped towards ending hunger, increased employment and helped communities on their way to sustainability. But, no, that is not all. In 2018, GirlStuff.Period will start to educate girls and boys on health, nutrition and family planning so they have the power to take charge of their own life.

We conduct programs to break the poverty cycle and raise awareness worldwide on the issue of menstrual pads. For this, we have built a new website for GirlStuff.Period, which will be launching this month. The website will also serve as an e-commerce platform for the menstrual kits.

 

Our biggest chance to make it all happen in 2018!

 

Our best chance of achieving our goals in 2018 is happening now via the Girl Fund Campaign powered by Global Giving.

We have until March 15th to get as many $10 donations as we possibly can to receive funding all year for GirlStuff.Period! Yes, all year! We just need to rank in one of the 4 top spots and our goals will be met for this year. We only have 5 days left though!

 

We are asking you to make a commitment to GirlStuff.Period before March 15th. Even $10 will make a lasting impact on a young girl’s life in South Africa.

 

Let’s make their dream of education and a career come true today. Head over to GirlStuff.Period on Global Giving and donate.

 

YOUR DONATION IS A VOTE FOR GIRLSTUFF.PERIOD.

 

Take action to support GirlStuff.Period by clicking here.

 

Thank you so much!

How do we manage initiatives on an ongoing basis with One Brick at a Time?

How do we manage initiatives on an ongoing basis with One Brick at a Time?

We've received some questions relating to how we manage projects and initiatives once they have been operationalized and so we thought we share the information from the last call.

Timing

In our last meeting with the water council and project team, we had some important updates. Every two weeks we meet with the Bergnek Water Council on a conference call and then once a quarter we have a more significant update and discussion to address any challenges that have arisen for the community. 

Agenda: Project Status & Updates – Next Steps

  • Looking at alternatives for power source – Due to ESKOM's lengthy delays (12-14 months) we may need to use solar panels to power the pump and return the transformer back to ESKOM. -- Warren
  • To stay abreast of progress, it is necessary for us to schedule more group calls. as opposed to the direct calls to individual members of the Bergnek Water and Maintenance Councils. There are personal costs to having the conference call, whether that is for airtime or data on their cell phones, so we need to be creative in how we achieve this.
  • Skype call might be better – if they have data.
  • If the community/MAWO assigns a person from the community, EWB- Central Houston can call them on a regular basis to get the updates. Receiving calls are free.
  • We need to know weekly if all the tanks are being filed up a formal log needs to be maintained that indicates how much water are people able to get now compared to before. Isaac should handle the system logs, as he is the person most involved. Isaac, Josef, & Japi are operating the system with Pete assisting them.
  • Currently only one transformer is working (other side of the road is not working) - Contact ESKOM and Polokwane Maintenance.
  • Pump update: When the electrical pump is working, it is running with the timer for 12 hours. After 12 hours, it fills “1.5 bars” (~38,000 liters) on the tank. The old electrical pump (751) fills 1 bar of the tank – With the help of the diesel pump (611) (next to the electrical pump), the rest of the tank can be filled in an additional 12 hours.
  • Big tank gets full in 1 day (24 hours)
  • It is possible to have more than 2 water runs for a week but most of the taps do not close and the water gets wasted on the ground, so the community is running the pumps with less time. We need to have distribution system checked and maintained.
  • The pulleys are not working for the smaller tanks, so they are not being used.
  • Keith will give EWBCH new contact information for community members to call.
  • Shasi will organize the next call with the community member(s) after receiving the contact information.

Giving you insight into the process

I thought I'd share this information with you all to give you a broader context and insight into what happens in the communities we support. Although the community members work diligently to ensure projects are kept on track and the daily and weekly work is being done, they often times are met with challenges outside of their control or influence.

When we are invited into communities, we make a long-term commitment to work alongside them. We do this because there is no quick fix to the issues they face. The solutions take time to implement and time for us to train and update training for community members as they learn new skills and we move to the next stages of the initiatives and projects.

Share your Excitement

We ask that you forward this project report to 2 friends or begin your own fundraising page for the cause here on GlobalGiving.

We are grateful for your ongoing support and for all you, as a donor, have already done to create positive change in the Bergnek community, and are always grateful for you our supporters, and especially for those of you who give to the One Brick at a Time project every month. Thank you for your contributions, your messages and for sharing the work we do with the wonderful people of Bergnek. We appreciate you and the people of Bergnek most certainly do too. 

We won't give up on the communities we serve, and we know you won't either!

 

Take action to support One Brick at a Time by clicking here.

The main reason girls quit school in Africa…

The main reason girls quit school in South Africa...

We’ve heard it all. When first started working in rural South African communities we noticed that many girls quit school after grade 7 or 8, and so we started to investigate why that was happening. Was it cultural? Where the girls being asked to quit school to do things at home?

We interviewed girls and boys and went to schools to ask the questions. Where are all the girls? Why are the higher grades filled mostly with boys? Is this part of a cultural or tribal tradition?

The answers were different, depending on who was answering the questions. The boys said the girls were lazy, or not as ‘clever’ as they were and quit because they couldn’t understand or were just being lazy and always took time off school.

The girls had very different answers. They didn’t have menstrual supplies and when they started having periods the boys would tease them, if their period started at school and they messed their clothes. When they were fortunate enough to have their period start at home, they had to stay home for the week each month and started to fall behind at school. They were teased and bullied about being lazy or ‘stupid’. They felt left out, left behind and so quit school because it was easier on them. They didn’t want to be teased and bullied because boys just didn’t get it.

The girls that were at school when we asked the questions became really annoyed and told the boys how ‘stupid’ they were for not being able to figure out and understand the real reason why. Once they boys heard this, they became apologetic and a number of them actually volunteered to support the girls and go back into the community and encourage the girls to come back to school.

Imagine being bullied every month because of your period. Could you or would you handle it? Would you expect your daughter to handle it?

From these circumstances, GirlStuff.Period was born. The women of Bergnek, Limpopo, South Africa started GirlStuff.Period and manufacture washable, reusable, safe menstrual kits for women and girls, but they can’t help all the girls they’d like to without our help. They take action every day, to do as much as they can. Let’s show them it’s worth it and lend a hand up by donating to the cause.

Donate to support a girl take advantage of all the opportunities a boy has. She will thrive and do more for her community than we could imagine.

 

Take action to support Pads Against Bullying by clicking here.

What would you do without menstrual products?

What would you do without menstrual products?

How different would your life be if you had to go without menstrual products? Interesting question, right?

If you didn’t have menstrual products available to you, you wouldn’t be able to work a full month each month and you’d earn less. There is already a gap between what men are paid and what women are paid to do the SAME job. Imagine if you had to take a week off each month because you didn’t have menstrual products.

Women in rural South African and other African countries actually live with this problem. How do you think they are doing?

If you or your daughter, didn’t have menstrual products as a girl, you’d or they would have to miss a week of school a month. Do you think you’d be able to catch up to the boys? Research shows that just missing a day a month makes it extremely difficult to keep pace at school with other students, imagine what a week of missing school every month would do to your learning ability. Girls would be so far behind boys they would lose out on most of the opportunities boys have, because they can go to school all the time, they don’t need menstrual products.

Girls in rural South African and other African countries live this reality. Imagine how they feel about themselves and their ability to take care of themselves and their future families?

Imagine: Changing a girl’s life is as simple as starting by giving them a reusable, washable, safe menstrual kit and giving them the chance to stay in school all month long, every month.

What would you do without menstrual products?. Donate to support a girl take advantage of all the opportunities a boy has. She will thrive and do more for her community than we could imagine.

 

Take action to support Pads Against Bullying by clicking here.

It all starts with the pads to help girls in Africa!

It all starts with pads to help girls in Africa!

 It starts with a simple thing that most of the girls in the developed world take for granted. It’s the simplicity of having a menstrual pad available when your period arrives. In the developed world, women and girls don’t have to give a second thought as to whether they will have menstrual supplies available and ready when they need them, in the third world it’s an entirely different story.

Think about it from this perspective; if you could not afford food every day and you had a very limited amount of money, would you buy food or menstrual supplies?#FirstWorldProblems

This is a question that girls in rural South Africa, and other African countries, have to answer every month and they of course choose food over menstrual supplies.

What that means for them is they miss a week of school every month. Imagine how difficult it is for girls in these circumstances to keep pace and catch up? It’s literally impossible, they simply can’t, and the sad part is that the lack of something so simple sets them back and continues a cycle of poverty for the rest of their lives.

Girls deserve the chance to thrive and break the chains of intergenerational poverty as much as boys do. They deserve what you have and what you take for granted.

The women of Bergnek, Limpopo, South Africa manufacture washable, reusable, safe menstrual kits for women and girls, but they can’t help all the girls they’d like to without our help. They take action every day, to do as much as they can. Let’s show them it’s worth it and lend a hand up by donating to the cause.

Imagine: Changing a girl’s life is as simple as starting by giving them a reusable, washable, safe menstrual kit and giving them the chance to stay in school all month long, every month.

It starts with pads. Donate to support a girl take advantage of all the opportunities a boy has. She will thrive and do more for her community than we could imagine.

 

Take action to support Pads Against Bullying by clicking here.

A Health Clinic in Bergnek

A Health Clinic in Bergnek for 1,200 Women and Children

Picture yourself living in a rural community that is 30 miles from the nearest healthcare facility. On top of this you don't even have access to a car to get your children or yourself to health services when you need them. Your community barely has enough water for people to survive and there are no employment opportunities to change that. Children have already died here because of the lack of basic healthcare. You can help Bergnek change that.

Challenge

After a tragic incident that occurred on the 15th of January 2007, in which Keith's two year old son died because of the lack of basic medical support, the Bergnek Community Clinic project was born. Keith's son got very sick and died suddenly after a very brief illness. Although Keith's mother was staying with the child, and called an ambulance, by the time the ambulance arrived, Keith's son was already dead. This is not the only incident, but a painful example of life in Bergnek, Limpopo.

Solution

By providing an healthcare clinic within the community that can support basic healthcare for children, pre- and post-natal care and birthing support, the community will not have to suffer the loss of more children in the community and give other children the basic healthcare to grow up healthier.

Long-term impact

Having a clinic in the community will provide healthcare to 1,800 community members of which 1,200 are women and children. It will also help to ensure that the 50 children born in the community each year, arrive healthy and have the services needed to help keep them healthy.

Take action to build a clinic by clicking here.